A critical element of counterterrorism strategy is the role of intelligence. A panel of experts discussed important questions on this timely topic at a recent seminar, including: What is the price for democratic concerns, including issues such as metadata, detention, interrogation, renditions, prosecutions, and punishment?  Can less liberty equal more security? What is the cost to international cooperation in combating terrorism in light of the NSA revelations? Can counterterrorism policies strike a balance between security and freedom?

Professor Yonah Alexander, Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, moderated the event.  The panel included Ambassador Javier Ruperez,  Former Ambassador of Spain to the United States, and Assistant Secretary-General and Director of Counterterrorism at the United Nations Security Council; Marc Norman, Director for Africa, Europe and the Americas, Bureau of Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of State; Dr. Wayne H. Zaideman,  Former FBI Legal Attaché in the Middle East; Peter Roudik,  Assistant Director of Legal Research and Chief, Eastern Law Division at the Law Library of Congress; and Margarita Assenova,  Director of Programs for the Balkans, Caucasus & Central Asia, The Jamestown Foundation.

Several organizations co-sponsored the event:  The Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; the International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and the Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40634247

Security issues relating to chemical weapons and military nuclear capability were the main topics at a recent seminar on "Reassessing the WMD Challenges:  The Next Phase?"

A panel of experts looked at the foremost security concerns in the Middle East and beyond, which are the future outlook for the dismantlement of Syria’s chemical weapons and preventing Iran from obtaining military nuclear capability.  The panel and the audience examined whether the issues can be resolved peacefully;  the panel also assessed tactical and strategic perspectives for the coming months.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies co-sponsored the event with the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; the International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and the Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

The seminar can be viewed here.

Sometime between the summers of 2009 and 2010, a computer worm that came to be known as Stuxnet destroyed about 1,000 centrifuges at Iran's Natanz (nuclear) Fuel Enrichment Plant.  The mission hinged upon superb intelligence, keen understanding of how the Natanz facility worked, and perfect delivery.  Stuxnet was historic because it fulfilled the century-old quest for exquisite targeting that began with the advent of powered flight.  Smith combines history and contemporary developments to weave a strategic fabric with important future implications.

Amb. David J. Smith, Senior Fellow and Cyber Center Director, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, opened the discussion.  Mr. John Toomer was commentator; Toomer is Director of Intelligence, Information and Cyber Systems, Government Operations, The Boeing Company.  Mr. Toomer is a retired USAF Colonel with extensive experience in cyber matters.  He was also Associate Professor at the US Army Command and Staff College where he taught courses on the development of airpower.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40273979

International cooperation is a key strategy in combating terrorism. And yet, the NSA revelations and the controversy over the latest U.S. raids in Libya and Somalia, as well as escalated drone operations in Yemen, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, have raised questions regarding U.S. intelligence sharing, the rule of law, and partnership collaboration with other nations.

A panel of experts provided an assessment of future policies and actions anticipated in response to terrorism at home and abroad.

The event was cosponsored by the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; The International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; The Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and The Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40134244

General (ret.) Alfred Gray, Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, provided opening remarks, noting the 30th anniversary of the attack on the military barracks in Lebanon, which killed 241 U.S. military members.  

Prof. Yonah Alexander, Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies,  moderated the panel.

Panel members included Dr. Michael S. Bell, Colonel, U.S. Army (Retired) and Chancellor, The College of International Security Affairs, National Defense University; Greg Gross, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense and senior staff member, U.S. Senate, currently a consultant on foreign policy and military affairs; and Dr Harlan K. Ullman, Senior Advisor at the Atlantic Council and Chairman of the Killowen Group.

International Cooperation in Combating Terrorism: An Updated U.S. Assessment

Thursday, October 24, 2013

International Center for Terrorism Studies, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies

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