Vital Infrastructure, Technology, and Logistics (VITAL)

Protecting Our Critical Infrastructures

US critical infrastructures encompass highly visible sectors like transportation, water, and agriculture as well as less conspicuous sectors like energy, finance, and information technology (IT). If any of these infrastructures were attacked, whether by hostile nation-states or by non-state actors, it would have major negative impacts on our national security and the economic well-being of our country. Even less nefarious disruptions to the supply chain, caused by inclement weather for example, are increasingly worrisome as the global economy becomes more intertwined and interdependent.

Due to the number, scale, and complexity of these sectors, no one entity can tackle the issue of critical infrastructure vulnerability alone. Both government and industry have a shared interest in the continued stability of domestic infrastructures and their global supply chains and are thus natural allies in the efforts to secure these systems. Through improved communication and strategic planning, industry and government entities can combine and coordinate efforts in comprehensively securing critical infrastructures.

The DCIP defines the following 16 sectors as critical based on their influence on the nation’s economic health and security: chemicals, commercial facilities, communications, manufacturing, dams, defense, emergency services, energy, finance, food and agriculture, government facilities, healthcare, information technology (IT), nuclear facilities, transportation, and water. The number of sectors considered vital to the US is simply too great to be managed by one office of the federal government, or even by the federal government alone. Taken together, the 16 critical sectors identified by the DoD account for thousands of companies, millions of jobs, and billions of dollars of revenue changing hands across the country. The only effective way to provide comprehensive critical infrastructure protection is through a coordinated effort, both among government agencies and between government and industry. The VITAL Center aims to bridge the gap between government and industry security efforts by connecting diverse stakeholders from both worlds, creating a community of interest to create more comprehensive mechanisms of action for critical infrastructure protection.

Courses

Microelectronics: Foundations and Futures, A Virtual Executive Course

The four half-day virtual course will explore the history of microelectronics, detail the current state of the practice, as well as review legacy and state of the art technology needs and their impact on the United States economy and national defense. Instructors will include industry leaders, government officials, technical experts, and key decision makers and influencers to understand the big picture of this technology area that affects every part of American culture and economics. This policy-oriented course is perfect for industry, government, and academic professionals alike with a shared goal of identifying and addressing the challenges the US faces in the microelectronics industrial arena.

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Workshops

 

 Hardware Security Symposium

 

Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 10:00am – 11:30am

Speaker: Tom Bergman, Battelle

Battelle has been developing and testing a technology to nondestructively classify electronic components as authentic or counterfeit. Currently, alternative effective detection methods require exhaustive testing of all component functionality, destructive analysis of test devices, or use of a specialized imaging technique. The Barricade technology developed at Battelle does not require integrated circuit design modifications, physical alterations to existing inventory, or any changes to electronic component manufacturing processes to perform the classification process. The technology uses a method that differentiates classes of devices from data acquired from their power consumption waveforms. The Barricade system is based on the concept of side channel power analysis, a technique that involves collecting unintentional or side channel emissions from a device. The collected data files are loaded into the Barricade classifier algorithm that performs the electronic component classification. Battelle will be presenting details on the continued development of this system, including presenting new data collected on authentic, counterfeit, and cloned components.